The Halloween Documents: Microsoft’s Anti-Linux Strategy 15 Years Later

31 10 2013

It’s almost Halloween—which marks 15 years since Eric S. Raymond published the first leaked “Halloween Documents” documenting Microsoft’s (MSFT) secret strategy to compete with Linux and open source. A lot has changed since then, when terms such as “fear, uncertainty and doubt” (FUD) first exploded into the lexicon. But how much remains the same? Do Microsoft and open source play nicely today?

The Halloween Documents, so-called because the first one leaked in October 1998, don’t actually have much to do with Halloween itself—which I find sad, as an avid fan of the holiday. But for understanding the historical relationship between Microsoft and open source, the memos are vital.

They were the first to reveal the particularly nasty “tricks” Microsoft planned in its effort to contain the open source movement, and to prevent Linux in particular from cutting too deeply into its revenue. One key strategy for the company was implementing proprietary protocols to lock customers into Microsoft software. Another was touting Microsoft software as offering lower total cost of ownership (TCO) than Linux, even though the documents showed that Microsoft itself found Linux to be the cheaper overall solution in many cases.

History, however, has proven Microsoft’s strategy largely wrong. Fifteen years after Raymond published the first of the documents (he subsequently added several more to his site, along with extensive commentary), which Microsoft later acknowleded to be authentic, Windows and Linux continue to coexist. And while Linux and open source never became an existential threat to Microsoft, as the Halloween Documents suggest executives at the company once feared, it’s hard to deny that they have significantly curtailed the company’s share of important markets, like servers operating systems and applications, for many years. Microsoft might be a richer enterprise today if it had achieved the goals it articulated in the Halloween Documents.

Read Full Article @ The Var Guy

Posted from WordPress for Android





Kubuntu Linux Emerges From Ubuntu’s Shadow

5 09 2013

The KDE desktop variant of Ubuntu Linux gets its own commercial support as it begins life away from Canonical.

Thanks to support vendor Emerge Open, the Kubuntu Linux distribution now has its own commercial support for those users and enterprises that need or want it. Kubuntu is the KDE desktop version of the Ubuntu Linux distribution that is commercially supported by Canonical. The primary Ubuntu Linux distribution is based on the GNOME Linux desktop.

“Canonical used to provide a commercial support service for Kubuntu but dropped it last year,” Kubuntu developer Jonathan Riddell told eWEEK.

Riddell explained that Kubuntu is one of the flavors of Ubuntu and, along with the flagship Ubuntu Desktop, it gets server infrastructure to build packages and host Kubuntu distribution.

Read Full Article

Posted from WordPress for Android





Dell releases powerful, well-supported Linux Ultrabook

30 11 2012

image

The laptop comes with Ubuntu Linux 12.04 LTS plus a few additions. Dell worked closely with Canonical and the various peripheral manufacturers to ensure that well-written, feature-complete drivers are available for all of the laptop’s hardware. Out of the box the laptop will just work. They also have their own PPA if you want to pull down the patches separately, either to reload the laptop or to use on a different machine.

The hardware is solid, but the software is the fun part. The Project Sputnik team cooked up two open source tools which come preloaded on the laptop, aimed at automating setting up development environments and making deployment easier: the Profile Tool and the Cloud Launcher.

To find out more, Ars spent some time with Barton George, Web Vertical Director at Dell and one of the biggest driving forces behind Project Sputnik. The Profile Tool, described here on George’s blog, is an application that facilitates the installation of preconfigured development tools, referred to as “profiles.” It’s originally the idea of Charles Lowell, one of the early Project Sputnik “alpha cosmonauts” (the awesome appellation for those who helped test the project in its early stages). The Profile Tool is almost a “reverse cloud” deployment utility, pulling distributed resources down from the cloud to your local workstation.

read full article

Posted from WordPress for Android





Linux brings over €10 million savings for Munich

23 11 2012

image

Over €10 million (approximately £8 million or $12.8 million) has been saved by the city of Munich, thanks to its development and use of the city’s own Linux platform. The calculation of savings follows a question by the city council’s independent Free Voters (Freie Wähler) group, which led to Munich’s municipal LiMux project presenting a comparative budget calculation at the meeting of the city council’s IT committee on Wednesday. The calculation compares the current overall cost of the LiMux migration with that of two technologically equivalent Windows scenarios: Windows with Microsoft Office and Windows with OpenOffice. Reportedly, savings amount to over €10 million.

The study is based on around 11,000 migrated workplaces within Munich’s city administration as well as 15,000 desktops that are equipped with an open source office suite. The comparison with Windows assumes that Windows systems must be on the same technological level; this would, for example, mean that they would have been upgraded to Windows 7 at the end of 2011. Project parameters such as scope, duration, applied methodology or external support were assumed to be the same in all scenarios.

According to the calculation, Windows with Microsoft Office would so far have incurred about €11.6 million (£9.3 million) in operating-system-related costs. Microsoft Office and its upgrades would have cost €4.2 million (£3.3 million), and the Windows system about €2.6 million (£2.1 million). The LiMux project allowed a further €5 million (£4 million) for hardware upgrades in connection with the Windows 7 system upgrade. Application migration costs were estimated to be around €55,000 (£44,000). If the city council had chosen Windows but used OpenOffice, the estimated cost would have been about two thirds, or €7.4 million (£5.9 million).

Full Article

Posted from WordPress for Android





Ready for Another Linux Tablet? Meet the Rugged Trimble Yuma | PCWorld

7 02 2012

Targeting military and industrial applications requiring data collection, inspection, and reporting from the field, the Linux-powered Yuma can be used with geospatial software including GRASS GIS and Quantum GIS as well as other standard or custom Linux-based applications. The device is available starting at $3695 on SDG’s website.

FULL STORY
http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/249454/ready_for_another_linux_tablet_meet_the_rugged_trimble_yuma.html

Posted from WordPress for Android





Kubuntu 9.10 (Karmic Koala) Released

29 10 2009

released

Kubuntu is built with the latest KDE desktop on top of a solid Ubuntu core. We believe this combination delivers a fantastic all-round home desktop experience. Our selection of tools and applications will provide you with all that you need for most of your tasks, with many more available just a few clicks away! Whether browsing the web, playing your music, composing an e-mail or connecting with your friends on social networks, Kubuntu 9.10 brings you an innovative and attractive platform for all your desktop needs.

Read on for information on how to get Kubuntu and what is new in Karmic.

Installing 9.10

Full Release announcement





It’s Time for an International Linux Summit

20 07 2009

tux_book_circle

Just like the international gang summits in Los Angeles, Linux needs a collective, “sit-down” to discuss the future of this now formidable operating system. I’m not talking about a nice little get together with keynote speakers with high-powered, 10,000 foot views of where Linux is and where it’s going. And I’m not talking about vendor booths touting the latest and greatest Linux toys or big blowout parties from a spectacle-making platinum sponsor.
What we need is a nuts and bolts, sound-proofed room, gathering of the minds and Linux thought leaders to discuss Linux, its current state, its legal standing and its future as an operating system.

It’s time to get serious.

It’s time to focus on the future.

We need key players and contributors from Google, Yahoo, Red Hat, Novell, Debian, Ubuntu, The Linux Foundation, Slackware, CentOS, Oracle, IBM, HP, Intel, AMD, VMware and Citrix to come together and hash out a grand plan for this once niche operating system that’s grown up into the enterprise-level beast that has changed the world.

We need for the best minds in the world to come together in one place for a concentrated focus on creating a Linux map for the next 10 or so years. This map should include the role of Linux in cloud-based computing, virtualization, embedded applications, supercomputing, space exploration, education and energy.

Read the full story at Daniweb