The Halloween Documents: Microsoft’s Anti-Linux Strategy 15 Years Later

31 10 2013

It’s almost Halloween—which marks 15 years since Eric S. Raymond published the first leaked “Halloween Documents” documenting Microsoft’s (MSFT) secret strategy to compete with Linux and open source. A lot has changed since then, when terms such as “fear, uncertainty and doubt” (FUD) first exploded into the lexicon. But how much remains the same? Do Microsoft and open source play nicely today?

The Halloween Documents, so-called because the first one leaked in October 1998, don’t actually have much to do with Halloween itself—which I find sad, as an avid fan of the holiday. But for understanding the historical relationship between Microsoft and open source, the memos are vital.

They were the first to reveal the particularly nasty “tricks” Microsoft planned in its effort to contain the open source movement, and to prevent Linux in particular from cutting too deeply into its revenue. One key strategy for the company was implementing proprietary protocols to lock customers into Microsoft software. Another was touting Microsoft software as offering lower total cost of ownership (TCO) than Linux, even though the documents showed that Microsoft itself found Linux to be the cheaper overall solution in many cases.

History, however, has proven Microsoft’s strategy largely wrong. Fifteen years after Raymond published the first of the documents (he subsequently added several more to his site, along with extensive commentary), which Microsoft later acknowleded to be authentic, Windows and Linux continue to coexist. And while Linux and open source never became an existential threat to Microsoft, as the Halloween Documents suggest executives at the company once feared, it’s hard to deny that they have significantly curtailed the company’s share of important markets, like servers operating systems and applications, for many years. Microsoft might be a richer enterprise today if it had achieved the goals it articulated in the Halloween Documents.

Read Full Article @ The Var Guy

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Open Virtualization Alliance gains 65 new members

24 06 2011

American Linux distributor Red Hat has announced that the Open Virtualization Alliance (OVA) has gained 65 new members, a nearly ten-fold increase in membership since it was first established last month. Brocade, Dell, EnterpriseDB, Fujitsu Frontech, FusionIO, Gluster, Groundwork Open Source, MontaVista Software, Univention and Vyatta, for example, are among the group’s new members.

Read The full Story @ The H Open.

Complete List of new members

Abiquo, AdaptiveComputing, Afore Solutions, Arista Networks, Arkeia, autonomicresources, B1 Systems, BlueCat Networks, Brocade, Carbon 14 Software, Cfengine, CheapVPS, Cloud Cruiser, CloudSigma, CloudSwitch, CodeFutures, CohesiveFT, Collax GmbH, Convirture, Corensic, Dell, enstratus, EnterpriseDB, Everis Inc., Fujitsu Frontech, FusionIO, Gluster, Inc., Grid Dynamics, Groundwork Open Source, HexaGrid Computing, IDT us, Infinite Technologies, Information Builders, Killer Beaver, LLC, Likewise, Mindtree Ltd, MontaVista Software, Morph Labs, nanoCloud, Neocoretech, Nicira Networks, Nimbula, novastorm, One Convergence, OpenNebula / C12G Labs, Providence Software (XVT), Proxmox Server Solutions GmbH, Qindel, RisingTide Systems, ScaleOut Software, Sep Software, Shadow Soft, Smartscale, StackOps, stepping stone GmbH, Storix, UC4, Unilogik, Univention, Usharesoft, Virtual Bridges, Vyatta, Weston Software Inc, XebiaLabs and Zmanda

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Mercado de software livre a crescer 22% ao ano

6 08 2009

Casa dos Bits - Tek.sapo.ptO mercado mundial de software livre deverá crescer anualmente a uma taxa de 22,4 por cento até 2013, segundo previsões recentes da IDC.

Nesse ano as receitas mundiais deverão subir até aos 8,1 mil milhões de dólares (cerca de 5,6 mil milhões de euros).

A avaliação da adopção de software livre como uma decisão estratégica por parte das empresas está na origem do crescimento, refere a consultora.

Ler artigo completo em http://tek.sapo.pt





It’s Time for an International Linux Summit

20 07 2009

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Just like the international gang summits in Los Angeles, Linux needs a collective, “sit-down” to discuss the future of this now formidable operating system. I’m not talking about a nice little get together with keynote speakers with high-powered, 10,000 foot views of where Linux is and where it’s going. And I’m not talking about vendor booths touting the latest and greatest Linux toys or big blowout parties from a spectacle-making platinum sponsor.
What we need is a nuts and bolts, sound-proofed room, gathering of the minds and Linux thought leaders to discuss Linux, its current state, its legal standing and its future as an operating system.

It’s time to get serious.

It’s time to focus on the future.

We need key players and contributors from Google, Yahoo, Red Hat, Novell, Debian, Ubuntu, The Linux Foundation, Slackware, CentOS, Oracle, IBM, HP, Intel, AMD, VMware and Citrix to come together and hash out a grand plan for this once niche operating system that’s grown up into the enterprise-level beast that has changed the world.

We need for the best minds in the world to come together in one place for a concentrated focus on creating a Linux map for the next 10 or so years. This map should include the role of Linux in cloud-based computing, virtualization, embedded applications, supercomputing, space exploration, education and energy.

Read the full story at Daniweb