The Halloween Documents: Microsoft’s Anti-Linux Strategy 15 Years Later

31 10 2013

It’s almost Halloween—which marks 15 years since Eric S. Raymond published the first leaked “Halloween Documents” documenting Microsoft’s (MSFT) secret strategy to compete with Linux and open source. A lot has changed since then, when terms such as “fear, uncertainty and doubt” (FUD) first exploded into the lexicon. But how much remains the same? Do Microsoft and open source play nicely today?

The Halloween Documents, so-called because the first one leaked in October 1998, don’t actually have much to do with Halloween itself—which I find sad, as an avid fan of the holiday. But for understanding the historical relationship between Microsoft and open source, the memos are vital.

They were the first to reveal the particularly nasty “tricks” Microsoft planned in its effort to contain the open source movement, and to prevent Linux in particular from cutting too deeply into its revenue. One key strategy for the company was implementing proprietary protocols to lock customers into Microsoft software. Another was touting Microsoft software as offering lower total cost of ownership (TCO) than Linux, even though the documents showed that Microsoft itself found Linux to be the cheaper overall solution in many cases.

History, however, has proven Microsoft’s strategy largely wrong. Fifteen years after Raymond published the first of the documents (he subsequently added several more to his site, along with extensive commentary), which Microsoft later acknowleded to be authentic, Windows and Linux continue to coexist. And while Linux and open source never became an existential threat to Microsoft, as the Halloween Documents suggest executives at the company once feared, it’s hard to deny that they have significantly curtailed the company’s share of important markets, like servers operating systems and applications, for many years. Microsoft might be a richer enterprise today if it had achieved the goals it articulated in the Halloween Documents.

Read Full Article @ The Var Guy

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Former Microsoft Staff Xuxian Jiang Spreads Android FUD

13 12 2012

Summary: A former Microsoft Research Intern is spreading some more “malware”-themed FUD about Android

ABOUT a year ago we wrote about lawyer who was spreading Android FUD after he had removed evidence (from his CV) of former Microsoft employment. He just sort of airbrushed it out of his career history, and just in time for an attack on Android. He then collaborated with a Microsoft lobbyist (who routinely pushes journalists to publish Android/Linux horror stories) in spreading his FUD. This is not a coincidence. It’s a pattern we learned to recognise.

Several weeks ago, former Microsoft staff crafted another piece of “malware”-themed FUD against Android. They try to play an angle which is clearly neglecting to account for trusted repositories and such. If one really insists on installing malware on one’s system, then harm is self-inflicted.

A couple of days ago, Android-hostile sites flooded the press with the “malware” talking point again, attributing the claims to someone who came from Purdue University. His old homepage is gone from the Web now. It was removed recently, but Google still has a cached copy that says:

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Microsoft Wants To Hide Which Patents Android, Linux Violate

30 07 2012

Bhartiya

There was always clouds of doubts around Microsoft’s claims that Android and Linux infringes upon their patents. While Microsoft continued to threaten companies into signing deals with them or face legal actions, it never disclosed what patents were at stake. The victims were forced to sign an NDA so that the world never gets to know which patents Microsoft is talking about — the chances are these are non-existent claims and Microsoft doesn’t want this bluff to be caught.

Barnes & Noble caught this FUD and counter sued Microsoft. Microsoft was sweating in its pants as the case headed towards the trial and Microsoft started to withdraw their bogus patents from the case. Just before the battle reach the trial Microsoft, typical to its character, paid B&N heavily, settled outside the court, and the world never got to see the bogus patents.

Microsoft is again at the verge of being exposed.

full article:





TOMTOM? Why are you paying to Microsoft?

29 03 2012

Year 2007, Microsoft’s used Forbes to accuse Linux of infringing upon its 235 patents. The one sided, pro-Microsoft Forbes story was seen as an attempt to scare the Linux companies and customers. It failed. I talked to almost every top-shot in the free software world and did a long story exposing how bogus those claims were. You can read the story here [PDF].
Linux continued to grow and with Android it is today the dominant platform of the world in the mobile market. Microsoft has not given up. They are still playing the same old, scare tactics. They are signing undisclosed deals with Android players over Linux patents.

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Linus Torvalds in comp.os.minix Dec 23 1992, 8:34 am wrote:

(b) do the long filenames by fooling around with several consecutive minix-type directory entries. Depending on how you do it, you can make old binaries see only th first characters of a extended filename, while new binaries see them all. Besides, this means you won’t waste a full 64-char direntry for short files, but instead use several entries only when necessary. The downside is that it’s a bit more work in the kernel.

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Microsoft Dirty Secrets – como a empresa de Bill Gates subverteu as leis do mercado e criou um monopólio

25 05 2009

Entrada do  blogue “o Vigia”

Esta entrada aqui no blog servirá para de alguma forma explicar ou documentar através de links a forma como a empresa de Bill Gates, Microsoft, subverteu as leis do mercado e criou um monopólio, colocando assim em causa a liberdade de escolha dos consumidores bem como a inovação e desenvolvimento da área de Tecnologias de Informação, uma vez que usou todos os truques sujos e mais alguns para destruir ou adquirir os seus concorrentes directos.

Tenho lido e comentado diversos artigos no site português relativo às novas tecnologias, o Tek da Sapo, e uma das coisas que mais me espanta é o enorme desconhecimento por parte das pessoas e até dos jornalistas que lá escrevem, das manobras e truques baixos que a Microsoft sempre usou desde o seu inicio para aprisionar os seus consumidores/clientes bem como destruir os seus concorrentes.

Link para a página do blogue

Neste mesmo blogue uma secção sempre em actualização sobre a MS